Back when I started podcasting, there was no such thing as a break. And so you just created a podcast. And it was like having another mouth to feed around your house because you always had to constantly feed it. And you never really took time off, because it was so hard to build it and get a following anyway, if you took time off, you knew you would be walking away from that. 

The Origins of Podcast Seasons

As podcasts have evolved, and more people have gotten into it. And the barrier to entry is so low with podcasting that a lot of people that are podcasting, maybe haven’t really thought it through all that well. And there’s a lot of people that want to once they get started, this thing called seasons comes up, and people want to make a season because they want to take a break. It’s a way for them to give themselves permission to take a break.. 

Doing Podcast Seasons Is a Big Tell

I’ve seen so many of my clients go away for a season and never come back. And their podcast is just sitting out there in the Apple podcast directory dead as a doornail. And so it’s very interesting how that first sign of wanting to have seasons or wanting to take a break is always a red flag for me as a Podcast Producer that that podcast is probably going to pod fade. 

And so when I see that happen, it’s like triggers all the podcast rescue techniques inside of me and I’m like, What do we need to do to get this podcast on life support, to give it a jolt of energy by throwing some extra coaching sessions and you do some things to try to get the podcaster back on track their mind in the game, and ready to go. 

It’s not always something I can win on. And I really try hard though, because you’ve worked so hard to build a podcast, you put time effort and everything into it. I can’t stand to watch your audience slip away.

Plan Ahead for Break Time for Yourself

Life does get in the way sometimes, and you have to do what you have to do. But I think if you plan for breaks, and you plan for ways to not stress yourself out with your podcast, that it can continue functioning even if you need a break from it. And that’s what I want to show you how to do today. 

Consistency is Key – Says Every Guru Ever

If you have an A listening audience that expects you to put out shows every week and the gurus will tell you that if you want to put out a podcast and gain a big following and have a successful show, what do you have to do? The number one rule they say is to be consistent. Well, not trying to debunk all the experts, but I have seen a few inconsistent shows be successful. But it’s sort of an outlier. It’s more of an anomaly than a cause and effect kind of thing. 

Taking a Break Means You Haven’t Monetized

If I see a podcast wanting to take a break, that is the number one red flag to me that that podcast is not generating any revenue for that podcaster. I understand it can take a while for you to begin generating revenue from your podcast. But if you’re not generating revenue, and your podcast is something you’re only putting out into the world, it’s hard to keep doing it when times get tough, and when your schedule gets pressed, and whenever your life gets chaotic, when it’s not bringing you any value. 

So it is one of the first things that go in your life, because it gives you a little bit of relief and a little bit of pressure off of your shoulders and all the things you have responsibilities for. 

But that being said, you’ll never be able to get consistent revenue from a podcast, if you keep taking breaks. And it’s just like anything you have to be there, you have to put out the content, and you have to do the work. 

Better Options Than Taking a Break

There are many ways you can take a break, but still feed your podcast audience too.

  1. Batch record solo shows that can be dripped out over the course of your break. 
  2. Air shows that you have been a guest on in your feed with an intro and outro by you.
  3. Release “encore” episodes of the most popular past shows with a new intro and outro explaining the re-airing of the show. 

The Logistics of Pulling It Off

Some podcasters that are used to doing interview shows really struggle with the idea of putting out solo shows. So, I wanted to give you a few ideas of some things you can talk about in solo shows.

  1. Share lessons you have learned from your first XX number of podcast interviews.
  2. Share case studies of how you have helped your clients get results.
  3. Share little pieces of micro-content from the frameworks that you teach your clients.
  4. Share lessons learned from books you have been reading that can benefit your niche.

You don’t have to be the expert, even to do solo shows. Just share content your audience will find valuable.

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You can also find Christy and her team at www.teampodcast.com!

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